Steadfast Potpourri – ‘Owzat?

You can’t pigeonhole me. Don’t even try. Not even the venerable editors of this website can pigeonhole me. That is why I have been given the appellation “Steadfast Potpourri.” There is no rhyme or reason to what I write, except that I write as from a Steadfast Lutheran point of view. The Scriptures are the Word of God. The Symbolic Books of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church are a correct interpretation of Holy Scripture. This is not up for discussion! However, one never knows, even I don’t know, from what direction I will come or go. It’s buntes allerlei, beloved!

Speaking of strange things, what’s with the title of my first post: ‘Owzat? That strange word is what is shouted by a fielder in the sport of Cricket when he thinks he has caught the ball hit from the batsman. He screams “‘Owzat?”, which is short for, “How is that?” The umpire must either call the batsman out or say nothing.

“‘Owzat?” from my perspective is the question you might ask as the editors give me some license to write about anything that strikes my fancy. What gives them the right to give me the privilege? Perhaps their reason might be because, well, you can’t pigeonhole me. I love to read Luther and the orthodox Lutheran fathers. I have an intense love for Blessed Doctors Walther, Stöckhardt, Franz Pieper, and even some Wisconsin Synod heroes like Blessed Adolf Hönecke and Joh. P. Meyer (full disclosure: my wife is the daughter of a Wisconsin Synod pastor, so I have “WELS connections” by marriage!). I have a special interest in 20th century American Lutheran history, specifically the breakup of the Synodical Conference, the formation of so-called “micro-synods” in the wake of Missouri’s crawl toward a more moderate doctrinal position, and even careful study of theologians who were a part of the action in Saint Louis and elsewhere (Richard Caemmerer is one particular interesting man I might find time to write about in the future).

“‘Owzat?” for a beginning? See, I told you, you can’t pigeonhole me. Just when you think you have me figured out, I open another door that leads down a corridor that leads to another quest for something else. Where does this all end? Jesus Christ, our Crucified and Risen Savior. He is the Beginning and the End of all things for Steadfast Lutherans. Let this column be for His glory, and not mine, as together we follow Him in righteousness, innocence, and blessedness all the days of our lives.

 

Associate Editor’s Note:  With this free-pigeoned post we gladly introduce Pastor David Juhl to you.  I met Pastor Juhl at Symposia a couple years back at one of their versions of the “no pietists allowed” parties.  Here is some more information about him:

The Reverend David Michael Juhl was born June 1, 1972 in Du Quoin, IL. He was born from above by water and the Holy Spirit on June 18, 1972 at Bethel Lutheran Church, Du Quoin, IL. He was confirmed on March 23, 1986 at Bethel congregation.

He attended Du Quoin public schools, graduating from Du Quoin High School in 1990. He attended John A. Logan Junior College, Carterville, IL, and Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, graduating with the Bachelor of Arts in Radio and Television in 1994. Before attending seminary, Pastor Juhl was a radio disc jockey, working for WDQN Radio in Du Quoin, IL and volunteering at WSIU/WUSI/WVSI Radio in Carbondale, IL while a student at SIU.

Pastor Juhl is a 2002 graduate of Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, IN. He served his vicarage at Faith Lutheran Church, Tullahoma, TN. His first charge after graduation was Trinity Lutheran Church, Iuka, IL, where he was ordained and installed on July 7, 2002. He served Trinity until March 4, 2007, when he accepted the Divine Call to serve Our Savior Lutheran Church, Momence, IL.

Pastor Juhl is married to the former Rebecca Warmuth since October 3, 2003. They have one daughter, Catherine, born September 3, 2004, and two sons, Matthew, born October 11, 2008, and Christopher, born August 12, 2010.

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