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Author Archive -- Pastor John Frahm III


Rev. John A. Frahm is pastor of Gloria Christi Lutheran Church in Greeley, Colorado, where he has served since 2006. He has previously served parishes in the Midwest. He is a 1998 graduate of Concordia Lutheran Theological Seminary in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada and was ordained by Dr. Ray Hartwig in 1998. He was editor of the former website Reformation Today, and has published articles in The Bride of Christ, Logia, and The Lutheran Witness magazines and is a charter member of The Augustana Ministerium. He has also been a guest on Issues Etc. In college years, he was active in Lutheran campus ministry activities and was the first president of Region 4 of Lutheran Student Fellowship, helping to organize the first LSF national gathering for college students. Pastor Frahm was born in Arlington Heights, Illinois and was raised in southern Minnesota. He is married to Jennifer, a Michigan native, whom he met while on vicarage in Michigan. Jennifer currently works as an instructional designer at a college in Greeley. He and Jennifer are the proud parents of Wyatt, who was stillborn and called home to heaven, at nearly full term in 2008. They look forward to seeing him again in heaven and they look for the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come. Pastor Frahm believes our biblical, confessional, and liturgical heritage is an asset to be boldly and forthrightly applied and used for the mission of the church.

Some Quotes for Discussion of AC XIV

Here are some quotes when considering AC XIV: XIV Of Ecclesiastical Order they teach that no one should publicly teach in the Church or administer the Sacraments unless he be regularly called.     “…it is with those who are legitimately chosen and called by God through the church, therefore with the ministers to whom the use or administration of the ministry of the Word and the sacraments has been committed.” Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent: Volume II, p.97   …[I]t is the response of the Lutheran theologians to the charge that John Eck made in his   More…

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A False Dichotomy:  Going To versus Being Church

Here’s a graphic that goes around in various versions online that expresses a way of thinking evidently at work among us:   Now both terms “consumer” and “missional” are new terms coined for the purposes of expressing an opinion by the proponents of this new ideology for church life and mission.   The classic way of speaking, of course, is that the church is apostolic.   This expresses the oneness in apostolic doctrine while also denoting the “sentness” of the church to confess Christ in the world.    Additionally, being apostolic in the classic dual-sense is undermined by indulging the collective old Adam,   More…

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The Spirit-Filled Church Is Known By Hearing, Eating and Drinking

“The wind blows where it wishes and you hear the sound of it, but cannot tell where it comes from or where it goes, so it is with those who are born of the Spirit,” the Lord Jesus said in His evening catechesis with the Pharisee Nicodemus on Holy Baptism.    There is a union between the Word of God and the Holy Spirit.   The Spirit is known by hearing with the ears.   This is not an internalized activity.  Even at the New Testament Pentecost in Jerusalem, the Spirit comes with the sound of a great rushing wind.   But Jesus is   More…

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A Proper Lutheran Altar Call — The Word Leading to the Supper

Jesus says to the church at Laodicea:   “Look, I stand at the door and am knocking.  If anyone hears My voice and opens the door, I will enter for the sake of him and sup with him and he with Me.”   It is the altar call.  The members of the church at Laodicea thought they were so rich, didn’t need anything, they didn’t want to make too much of the altar call, and didn’t want it too often so that it wouldn’t be special to them anymore. Not the kind of altar call some have in mind, eh?   Well, I   More…

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A Case for the LCMS Having a Government Information Office

There is no doubt that while we must distinguish between the two kingdoms, since it is essentially distinguishing between the law and the gospel, there is also no doubt that the two kingdoms interact on a daily basis in this world and in our own country.   The political and constitutional understanding of church and state closely relates to what we call the doctrine of the two kingdoms in Lutheran theology.   Both the kingdom of the left, the state or political processes of law, and the kingdom of the right, the ministry of Word and Sacraments in and through the church,   More…

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The Lord’s Supper as Christ’s Last Will and Testament

March 28th, 2013 1 comment

We hear the words during the consecration, “this cup is the new testament in My blood.”   However, most English Bibles will translate the words of Jesus as the “new covenant” (the Authorized or King James Version being a great exception).   While this might seem like an unimportant matter, historically Lutherans have seen great Gospel comfort in the translation of that word as “testament.” Interestingly in Luther’s German Bible, he translates the old promise of God (berith) as “covenant” (bund in German) whereas the new (diatheke/διαθήκη) as “testament.”   Many English translations of Lutheran theological works are not consistent in their translation   More…

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons by David H. Petersen: A Review by Rev. John A. Frahm III

January 16th, 2013 3 comments

I’ve received my copy of a new book of sermons by Rev. David Petersen of Redeemer Lutheran Church in Fort Wayne, Indiana.   The book is a new publication from Emmanuel Press.   It is a nice sized paperback volume with a classic painting of the crucifixion on the cover (see graphic on right).   The kingdom of God comes by itself without our prayer, but it is clear as we learn from the preaching of the Word of God, it comes thereby to us for the delivery of forgiveness, life and salvation. We have in this selection of Pastor Petersen’s sermons during   More…

A Belated Reflection on Projection Screens in the Liturgical Context

The use of projection screens in place of printed books or bulletins in the Divine Service has become quite prevalent in some parts of North American Lutheranism.   With this said, I am not aware of any major study that has reviewed the implications of using said devices within the liturgical context, let alone for catechetical functions outside the sanctuary.  Obviously there is nothing in the Bible that forbids them as they didn’t exist until recently.  But this does not thereby commend their use to us.  Even when things are neither commanded nor forbidden, this does not mean they are completely   More…

The Vocation of Music in the Divine Service

We Lutherans, who are heirs of Johann Sebastian Bach and so many other great composers of sacred music, certainly understand that various instruments can be used faithfully in the liturgical context to God’s glory.   But what are some important considerations with respect to music in the Divine Service in the way it is used and selected with integrity? Thesis I – Nothing comes into the Divine Service “as is” from the world’s use.  It must be sanctified. Music is powerful but this power can be both negative and positive, and not simply from the perspective of taste or preference.   Music   More…

Reasons for Reverence in the Divine Service

Nowadays we hear promoted the idea of “dignified informality” for the services of God’s House.  This nonsensical slogan to promote a casual attitude in attending the Service of Word and Sacrament is quite disjointed from the theological reality of what is going on when God’s people are gathered to receive His gospel gifts in the liturgy. The “worship wars” are the new Thirty Years War for Lutherans in North America.    And it is on task to go beyond three decades and in the meanwhile, our walking together is being drawn and quartered far beyond what we should endure theologically and   More…

Eschatology and Life in the Two Kingdoms

 As Christians we are always living in the end times.   We are not waiting for them to begin (inaugurated eschatology).   The end times began with Jesus’ death.  The writer to the Hebrews says (1:1-2):  “Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets,  but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world.”   We live as citizens of heaven and as pilgrims within this world.   We live as members of the holy Christian Church,   More…

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Steadfast Citizens — Christians and the Bill of Rights

Christians live in particular nations throughout the world.   Each one is different.   God works through the authority He established in the various forms of government throughout the world.  But it is important to know your own government.   That is, it is important to know where God has placed you to live and serve in both kingdoms, in the right hand kingdom (grace, the church), and in the left hand kingdom (the law, the state).   One critical document along with the constitution of the United States is the Bill of Rights, which is the collection of the first ten amendments to   More…