Be at Leisure: A Lutheran Approach to Outreach, 6. Catechesis

So young men and young women are getting married to faithful Lutherans and having children. Excellent! Now comes the lifelong duty of parents: “Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the education and instruction … Continue reading

Lutheran Reflections on The Benedict Option

Lutheran Reflections on The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation by Rod Dreher Rev. John A. Frahm III Rod Dreher is senior editor of The American Conservative magazine.   He was an adult convert to Roman Catholicism … Continue reading

Gospel Notes – A New Weekly Resource for Parish Lay Catechesis!

This entry is part 5 of 37 in the series Gospel Notes

Laymen: Would you like to be able to focus on the content of your pastor’s sermon without being distracted by the dozens of questions that pop into your mind about what the text is about? Pastors: Would you like a … Continue reading

Brainwashing Our Children?

Are parents- especially Christian ones- brainwashing their children? Dr. Chester M. Pierce, Emeritus Professor of Education at Harvard Medical School and Psychiatry, thinks so. When speaking as at the 1973 International Education Seminar, he said: “Every child in America entering school … Continue reading

Steadfast in Education: Why Lutheran Schools and Why Lutheran Teachers?

Why do we need Lutheran schools? Why do Lutheran schools need Lutheran teachers? Though these are simple questions, their answers get at the whole reason that the extensive system of Lutheran schools exists in the first place. Lutherans in North … Continue reading

Steadfast in Education: John Milton, Classical Christian Educator

One of the presenters at this month’s conference of the Consortium for Classical and Christian Education (CCLE) was Dr. E. Christian Kopff, whose list of accolades and qualifications to speak to such an audience is far too long to list. … Continue reading

Steadfast in Education – The Classical and Lutheran Educator

Author’s note: This post begins a series that describes those things necessary for classical and Lutheran education. Many confessional Lutherans, including me, see a strong commitment to Lutheran education with a classical pedagogy as part of our identity as confessional … Continue reading