ACL / Luther Academy – Marriage, Sex, and Gender in the Lutheran Church Today

As found on the Lutheran Calendar here. Mark your calendars for this event!

 

The Association of Confessional Lutherans   and   The Luther Academy

are in the process of planning the next Congress on the Lutheran Confessions

ACL National Free Conference # 26

Luther Academy Lecture Series # 22

 

April 15 – 17, 2015

Ramada Mall of America

Bloomington (a suburb of Minneapolis), Minnesota

 

 

The overall theme for this congress is:

Marriage, Sex, and Gender in the Lutheran Church Today — In Light of the Lutheran Confessions

 

 

PROPOSED TOPICS FOR THE 2015

CONGRESS ON THE LUTHERAN CONFESSIONS

 

  1. Same-sex Marriage: The Challenges of its U.S. Legalization for Pastors and Congregations
  2. Homosexuals in the Congregation: Pastoral Ministry and Church Discipline from a Confessional Lutheran Perspective
  3. Cohabiting Couples in the Congregation: Pastoral Ministry and Church Discipline from a Confessional Lutheran Perspective
  4. Women’s Ordination and Congregational Roles Revisited: Can the Confessional Lutheran Synods Hold the Line?
  5. Have Lutherans Had a Unique View of Romance and/or Married Life, when Compared to Other Christian Traditions?
  6. Do the “Orders of Creation” Pertain Only to the Vocation of Marriage, or Also to Other Vocations?
  7. Canaan or Israel? The Old Testament’s Doctrine of Marriage in the Pentateuch and the Prophets
  8. Luther: What is Marriage Really?
  9. Divorce and Remarriage in the Parish and the Parsonage

 

Questions, Information: [email protected]

About Norm Fisher

Norm was raised in the UCC in Connecticut, and like many fell away from the church after high school. With this background he saw it primarily as a service organization. On the miracle of his first child he came back to the church. On moving to Texas a few years later he found a home in Lutheranism when he was invited to a confessional church a half-hour away by our new neighbors.

He is one of those people who found a like mind in computers while in Middle School and has been programming ever since. He's responsible for many websites, including the Book of Concord, LCMSsermons.com, and several other sites.

He has served the church in various positions, including financial secretary, sunday school teacher, elder, PTF board member, and choir member.

More of his work can be found at KNFA.net.

Comments

ACL / Luther Academy – Marriage, Sex, and Gender in the Lutheran Church Today — 59 Comments

  1. @Tim Schenks #50

    If Cathryn speaks to people in her own church about Tim’s claim that WELS is “heterodox on theology and practice of the Divine Call,” it’s unlikely that the people she talks to will actually explain how and in what way WELS is heterodox. Heck, they might even point out where it can be demonstrated that in the golden days of the Missouri Synod – back when C. F. W. Walther was the dominant influence – Divine Calls were issued not only to parish pastors, but also to missionaries, professors, and even parish school teachers! (And that’s all true, by the way.)

    As a general rule, we should be hesitant to accuse others of being heterodox or false teachers, when the general tenor of their theology is sound. Since I’ve got Walther on my mind, I’ll draw our attention to this statement by him, from “Duties of an Evangelical Lutheran Synod,” in Essays for the Church, Vol. II, pp. 58-59:

    As important as it is to be concerned with purity of doctrine, we dare not become irrational about it. If a member of a communion says something that is not correct, we must avoid attacking him immediately as a heretic. … Very sternly the apostle Paul writes, “Let there be no divisions among you!” [1 Cor. 1:10], and then he sharply rebukes [the Corinthians] because there already were divisions among them, and he adds, “Those who make divisions are carnal” [1 Cor. 3:3]. Let us take that to heart! Let us watch and pray that no unnecessary disputes will ever arise and be fostered, and that no one will go public in uncertain matters until he has informed others about it, so that, whenever possible, the fire can be quenched. … Only when God’s glory or the salvation of souls are clearly at stake, then we must engage in battle, even if it means the destruction of a synod that previously enjoyed God’s blessing. … When it comes to insignificant matters that have nothing to do with the salvation of immortal souls, we should never get involved in a serious dispute. But if someone who is always itching for a fight starts one, we must firmly put such a fellow in his place. Appropriate is 2 Tim. 2:14: “…warn them before God against quarreling about words.” A person may express an idea in a way that is completely wrong, even though he intended to say the right thing. That is why Gerhard writes: “It is wicked to interpret a poor choice of words as error, when you know that the right meaning was intended” (Locus on Good Works, sec. 38). Let us avoid ever doing that…! When someone makes “a poor choice of words,” we should avoid immediately labeling him as either a heretic or a false teacher. If necessary, we should instead correct him gently. (emphasis in original)

  2. @David Jay Webber #2
    back when C. F. W. Walther was the dominant influence – Divine Calls were issued not only to parish pastors, but also to missionaries, professors, and even parish school teachers! (And that’s all true, by the way.)

    If you say so, but didn’t you neglect to mention that they were all men, and probably ordained?

  3. @Tim Schenks #48
    In retrospect:

    01) Yes, let the called Pastor(s) of the congregation be the only ones that will speak in the Divine Service. This will then leave no doubt.

    02) As for allowing a Deacon, Elder, lay reader to speak in the Divine Service, I do believe there is a distinction.

    Only the pastor, a called and ordained man can write and then deliver the sermon “in the public square.” This is teaching with authority since we pastors are ordained and lay are not.

    OK, a layman can write a commentary, etc.; but he cannot and should not deliver what we call a sermon.

    He can read what we wrote in an emergency, and it should be noted that the pastor wrote it to the people. My Deacon read my sermon, but spoke it word for word in an emergency.

    When a lay person speaks a lesson, they are not expounding on it. They are reading word for word the text from the translation that the pastor allows. The Word does its work by the power of the Holy Spirit.

    And then yes, even a kids sermon (or message) unless the pastor wrote it for delivery, should not be done. Only the pastor can teach with authority.

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