Kieschnick’s new position

From the Concordia University – Texas web site:

Former Synodical President joins CTX
Rev. Jerry Kieschnick named Pres. Ambassador for Mission Advancement

Concordia University Texas announced today that Rev. Dr. Jerry Kieschnick, President Emeritus of The Lutheran Church — Missouri Synod, has been named to the newly created position of Presidential Ambassador for Mission Advancement. Dr. Kieschnick will begin his role on March 1.

“We are delighted to welcome Dr. Kieschnick into the Concordia family,” Dr. Tom Cedel, president of Concordia University Texas, said. “Jerry brings a new level of energy and expertise to the University; he also brings a valuable national—and global—perspective on our mission. He is a gifted leader who bridges denominational boundaries.”

Kieschnick has experience in multiple facets of ministry and mission and brings an expanded vision for outreach. In his new role, Kieschnick will nurture and expand existing relationships with congregations, organizations, foundations and individuals to support Concordia in its mission of developing Christian leaders while conducting necessary outreach to foster new relationships for the advancement of the University.

“The Lord has given me gifts and experiences to use in the cause for Christ,” Kieschnick said. “Coming to Concordia provides opportunity to think creatively and act strategically, influencing younger generations with the Gospel of Christ. I look forward to becoming an integral part of Concordia’s ministry and working with various constituents to further the University’s mission of developing Christian leaders.”


Comments

Kieschnick’s new position — 47 Comments

  1. “In his new role, Kieschnick will nurture and expand existing relationships with congregations, organizations, foundations and individuals to support Concordia in its mission of developing Christian leaders while conducting necessary outreach to foster new relationships for the advancement of the University.”

    So now I guess the poor student’s tuition will have to go up to pay a salary for a newly created, “official begger” position. They didn’t have one before?

    Rudy Wagner

  2. And I was going to recommend CTX to some of my friends! Guess that’s ruined now… :p

    Seriously, here’s hoping his position is ceremonial. His “expanded vision” for outreach has done enough damage. Sounds like his position is a glorified fundraiser, but never having worked at a college and only in my second semester of college as a student, I could easily be wrong.

  3. Well, while his administration skills leave a bit to be desired, I think he actually could be a great fundraiser for the school.

  4. And yes, this is nothing more than a fundraising position. I think it was his background prior to getting into Synod politics. Unfortunately these skills weren’t on terribly good display during his tenure, but I hope he’s able to help raise funds for Concordia.

  5. “He is a gifted leader who bridges denominational boundaries.” That is enough to make me very alarmed about Kieschnick’s role at Concordia Texas. Gerald Kieschnick certainly was not one to let things like denominational differences (often grave theological ones) between LCMS and other church bodies interfere with his welcoming their influence into Synod. I do not see that his bridging of denominational boundaries is of any real use to LCMS.

    His stewardship of the Synodical Presidency was not marked by any theological/confessional faithfulness, save in terms of lip service. As for fundraising, I think that CUT ought to find another way to raise money. Adding programs such as the one Keischnick will lead seems to be counter productive to the expressed mission of CUT as a LCMS institution of higher education.

  6. I voted for someone besides Gerald Kieschnick at three straight conventions, so I’m hardly a fan of his. But it’s time to move beyond beating him up here. So far, the postings have been singularly uncomplimentary to him, damning with faint praise, at best. Long before he was SP, the Synod began encouraging each synod enitity to raise its own funds, while at the same time reducing the moneys it sent to them. We are reaping a whirlwind as a result of this policy.

    If he has the skills and talents in “development” then we ought to rejoice that he has been given the opportunity to use these skills. Every one of our schools has advancement/development staffs, and it is an important part of their operation. I don’t have to agree with Dr. K. to be able to wish him the best, and hope that he is successful in his efforts to raise funds for Concordia.

    Enough already!

    Johannes

  7. This thread again!?
    Ok, don’t tell anyone this but I heard from a friend who heard from another that Kieschnick claimed to be the king of the Jews!

  8. @Johannes #6

    Johannes,

    You wrote….”So far, the postings have been singularly uncomplimentary to him, damning with faint praise, at best.”

    I beg to differ.

    I didn’t question GBK’s ability to do the job. By innuendo, my point was directed more toward the fact that a new position had been created that, to my knowledge, was not advertised on an official site (viz., Lutheran Witness or Reporter) for which only GBK could meet the requirements. I may be wrong on this, but was anyone else interviewed for the position? It seems to me the “buddy system” was looking after the ex-president. I, too, hope that he’s worth the investment made by the University, and that he’ll bring in more funds than will be expended on salary and benefits for him. In actuality, it seems to me that he will be doing the work normally done by the President of the institution. In times when funding for the Concordias is tight, seems that adding more, non-academic staff is not the way to go. The existing university administration should be doing that job.

    You are correct, however, in that the past president has been shown little respect on most of the BJS postings, and we have not generally put the best construction on everything, but in light of events during the past ten years it becomes very difficult to do otherwise.

    Rudy Wagner

  9. Walter,

    Development/Advancement/Fundraising teams at universities are typically quite large. And sometimes adding some firepower to that team is exactly what’s needed to enable an institution to hire more academics, etc.

  10. He is a Texan who knows a lot of Texans. The fund raiser position probably fits him by background and personality.

    By the way, the Concordia Texas materials are more explicitly Lutheran than any of the other Concordias I have seen, even more than Concordia Seward who does well.

  11. Using my “put the best construction on everything” mode, I congratulate the President Kieschnick on his new position, and I pray that his efforts lead to a prosperous University that proclaims the Gospel in it’s full truth and purity. He was not my cup of tea as a synod prsident, but he still has skills that God can and will use for the betterment of the Divine Kingdom……..

  12. @Walter R Wagner #8

    Thank you for your reasoned reply.

    You say, “…We have not generally put the best construction on everything, but in light of events during the past ten years it becomes very difficult to do otherwise.”

    Yes, it is difficult to put the best construction on everything, but we still make the effort.

    Johannes

  13. Mollie, you didn’t post the rest of the news release, which continues as follows:

    As the 12th president of the LCMS for more than 10 years, Kieschnick helped lead the Lutheran Church into the 21st Century. He began his presidency just three days before the September 11, 2001, terrorism attacks and was responsible for restructuring the church body and guiding its people to express their faith in Christ.

    “Jerry is infinitely gifted in translating the mission of the church and will build bridges to communities where Concordia can be most impactful,” Matt Berndt, former colleague and Director of Communication Career Services for the University of Texas at Austin, said. “He is creating Christian leaders for the world, not just the church.”

    Kieschnick had a dream to unite 100 million people to the Gospel of Christ by 2017, coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses. During his time as Texas District president for the LCMS, membership grew by approximately 12 percent in the Lutheran church.

    “Concordia is a great place for Jerry to use his gifts as a leader. He has a strong doctrinal understanding of the Gospel and a perspective that allows him to listen to and engage people,” Ken Hennings, Texas District president, Missouri Synod, said. “He knows what’s going on across various religious communities and brings experience and credibility to Concordia’s mission.”

    An alumnus of Texas A&M University, Kieschnick is returning to his native Texas.

    “Jerry brings national leadership to Texas and is returning home to a University that he believes in,” Matt Berndt said.

    Rev. Kieschnick and his wife live in Georgetown. Their two children and two grandchildren live in central Texas.

    http://www.concordia.edu/news/article.cfm?newsID=1431

  14. “He has a strong doctrinal understanding of the Gospel and a perspective that allows him to listen to and engage people. . . .”

    That is really quite a sentence.

  15. I’m sorry. Reading the presser, I am still not sold on him. I know the best construction and image will be to have a glowing news release, but I tihnk it is styled up. And yes, I know I have done that, too, on many a job resume, to make myself sound good. Not that I doubt much of what is said, but to what end? No, I became disillusioned with his presidency. I do think there are some good thing he can do with this new position. I guess we will see.

  16. @Charles Henrickson #15
    It also includes 1 just plain inaccuracy–he wasn’t president for “more than 10 years”, and the statement about the 12 percent growth is vague–*who* grew by 12 percent? It’s too bad that the publicity lady–Linda Brasher is listed as the poster–and I’m assuming she’s in their public relations office–put out a piece like this.

  17. Regardless, I think Mollie has it right. It is quite reasonable to expect that he will be a great asset to Austin in fundraising and development. (Just like I can’t refer to another one as “Chicago”…)

  18. @Nathan #2
    Seriously, here’s hoping his position is ceremonial.

    “I have no intention of retiring” –GK

    In your prayers, Nathan! –hej
    ———————————
    @Rev. David Mueller #17
    It is quite reasonable to expect that he will be a great asset to Austin in fundraising and development.

    If someone will tell me how much net money accrued to Synod from the “fundraising” of the last decade (consultants’ fees and borrowings-in-house subtracted), I will know better how to assess this theory.
    —————————
    Scariest phrase:
    “Kieschnick said. “Coming to Concordia provides opportunity to think creatively and act strategically, influencing younger generations…

    [Yes, I omitted some boilerplate about the Gospel of Christ. Being an “hermudgeon”, I don’t think that is what this is about. But saying what I do think got me branded as a “conspiracy theorist” yesterday, so I’ll refrain from stating the obvious.] 😉

    Just now, I can be thankful that the majority of students are not Lutheran at CTX… (except that some of them are getting an inaccurate picture of Lutheranism there).

  19. Did anybody mention that most of the “boys in the Office” at IC have gotten nice jobs, in Texas?

  20. Perhaps, it is important to remember that K did a lot of damage in Texas as district president to supplant confessional Lutheranism prior to his continuing on the same path as synod president.

    Like it or not, he has not changed and will continue to use his influence in Austin to give shape to his vision of Lutheranism there.

    I see no reason to put a best construction on a man who is unrepentant and who has not changed his vision on what he wants Lutheranism to be. He is what he is and he did great harm to confessional Lutheranism during his tenure as Texas district president and as Synod president.

    I am sad to see this kind of leaven added to CTX leadership and shudder at the kinds of things he will promote as “leadership” training for students.

  21. I agree that Rev. Kieschnick is well-suited this position – he is experienced in fund raising for nonprofits, with public relations, and has a high profile that should help open doors. He is skilled in these areas. He should do a great job for CU-T.

    However, as a representative as an academic institution he should stop using the title “Dr” as it is only an honorary degree awarded by his employer. This could put the university in quite a bad light among students and faculty at CU-T, peer institutions and the community general that a high profile representative of the institution using the title “Dr.” was awarded that title on an honorary basis by the institution itself. It raises doubts about the quality of the institution (seems more characteristic of a mail-order university) and denigrates the doctorates of the faculty of the institution.

    I understand that there is a long history of Synodical officials using the title ‘Dr.’ when that title was only honorary, and so Rev. Kieschnick was only following established practice in that regard while sering as Synodical President (though I know of no other organization where such a title is used as a professional credential). However, using the title “Dr.” when it is an honorary title only while in the role while as employee and representative of a university is quite a different matter.

  22. I wish the man well. Hopefully his fundraising efforts won’t cost CTX as much as they did the LCMS, Inc..

  23. @Rev. David Mueller #18
    Austin in fundraising and development. (Just like I can’t refer to another one as “Chicago”…)

    Habit, and all that, David… 🙂
    It was explained to me that Concordia Lutheran University, Austin, became CTX because it operates branches in Houston, Dallas and perhaps some other places. [It was a handy way to drop “Lutheran”, too… but there I go again!] 🙁

    CTX has moved to the suburbs, having sold out to a developer who bulldozed everything from Kilian Hall to a dorm less than 10 years old, before sitting down to count the cost of his dream.
    The result is one big building, one bigger hole in the ground, one bankrupt developer and one eyesore for the neighborhood.

  24. “Jerry is infinitely gifted in translating the mission of the church and will build bridges to communities where Concordia can be most impactful,” Matt Berndt, former colleague and Director of Communication Career Services for the University of Texas at Austin, said.newsID=1431

    I don’t want to bash Pres. Kieschnick. I want to bash Matt Berndt a little bit.

    “Infinitely gifted?” God has given Pres. Kieschnick infinite gifts? I realize this is hyperbole but it still is unseemly to say that someone is infinitely gifted at something, as though God communicated some part of His divine nature to Pres. Kieschnick.

    So what is it that Pres. Kieschnick is nearly divine in his ability to do? “Translating the mission of the church?” Man, sometimes I don’t know what language these church growth guys are speaking, and I don’t think they do either. “Translating the mission of the Church” into what? Uzbek? Pashtun? Mandarin? No, he means explaining the mission of the Church to laypeople or Generation X–probably that’s what he means. Why do you need to be almost divine to do that? Here’s the mission of the Church: “Go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to keep everything I have commanded you.” I think some false doctrine is hiding in this Klingon dialect that Matt Berndt is speaking. In all seriousness. I hope I’m wrong, but it sounds like maybe he thinks that being able to “translate the mission of the church”–i.e. “contextualize” God’s Word–somehow helps the church perform its mission. Why? Is my generation so unable to understand Pres. K’s, or are laypeople so unable to understand theology, that without “translation” laypeople don’t understand luther and young people don’t understand old people? I think sometimes if I were to just read Luther to people, they would understand him a lot better than they would me trying to explain Luther. They definitely understand Luther better than they understand this bizarre “missional speak.” The mission of the church is not really that hard to understand. It’s to give people the forgiveness of sins. The only way that’s hard to understand is if you don’t really believe that sin gets you judgment, death, wrath, and hell. And if you don’t believe that, you don’t need to hear about the mission of the church; you need to hear the law of God.

    Finally, “where Concordia can be most impactful.” http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/mcintyre/blog/2007/02/oh_the_impact.html

    I looked up impactful to see if this was really a word that I didn’t know about. I guess you can’t fault Matt for using it when apparently somebody else in the business world made up. But that kind of sums it up for me; we’re supposed to buy into this plan to evangelize the world taking its cues from corporate fads. And this big plan to save the Lutheran church and millions of lost unchurched people sells itself by wrapping itself in jargon that when you examine it, makes no freaking sense and employs lots of words made up a couple of years ago.

    Enough with the translation already. Why don’t we try learning what we’re trying to translate first–and just teaching the very simple basics of that again in the same English we always use? Maybe that will work, and instead of an “infinite gift for translating the mission of the church”–which I can’t remember God promising to give anywhere–the majority of us who have one talent could rely on the infinite “power of God for salvation” that is the Gospel. That is still, I think, to be far preferred above all other gifts, no matter how “infinite.”

  25. @Karl Hess #25

    Wow! Mr. Hess (Rev? Hess?) just gave us a clinic on “Curmudgeonism 101.” Notice that he stuck to the subject (his subject), did not engage in ad hominem attacks on either Matt Berndt or Gerald Kieschnick, altho he certainly didn’t spare the criticism, yet was not nasty, or even smarmy (sans synonyms).

    Mr. (sic?) Hess’ criticism is well founded. The writer of that hi-flown piece of verbosity needs to get out his Strunk and White and study it. There’ll be a test in the morning.

    Nice job Mr. Hess. I have a curmudgeon card all ready for you, if you’ll give your address to Norm. Once I receive it, your card will be in the mail. And you’ll be happy to know that you’ve been nominated for “Curmudgeon of the Year” by yours truly.

    Johannes (“Curmudgeons of the world, unite…..!”)

  26. The point is that the Austin hi tech area can allow not only donations of money,but also vast benefits in giving the students new technology to Bring The Gospel to the World in new media formats.
    It is great to see Theology get the Opportunity to meld with Technology.
    Concordia and the LCMS will benefit from Rev Keishnicks position as he takes them forward.
    The BJS blog is a simple example–the mobile APPS coming will precipitate huge changes.
    Take your 4 G phone,slide onto the current week and hear the Service in your native language,anywhere !
    That’s the Real Church Growth I hope to see and my encouragement to Rev Kieschnick is to meld Technology into Theology into the Students.

  27. @Richard Sutis #28

    Richard, how can this new technology bring Christ’s Body and Blood to those who decide not to go to church? Do we then despise the Sacraments and rely on the almighty Blackberry to bring the Word? I don’t think so. Technology is fine, but it cannot bring the Body and the Blood, nor can it baptize.

    Kiley

  28. I personally wish Dr. K all the best in his new endeavor; he certainly has the gift of gab that any fundraiser guru, or car salesman, should have; however, I will not forget the loose doctrine and interpretation that caused even more division within the Synod.

    Frankly, I worry about the access to young, impressionable sheep drawn to that university only to be fed sugary, feel-good candy, and not the meaty, sometimes bitter food that is the True Word.

    Kiley

  29. He is creating Christian leaders for the world, not just the church.

    Funny, I didn’t know President Kieschnick actually created leaders. “Let there be Leaders.” And it was so.

  30. Todd Wilken :

    He is creating Christian leaders for the world, not just the church.

    Funny, I didn’t know President Kieschnick actually created leaders. “Let there be Leaders.” And it was so.

    Can you say “Hyperbole?”

    j

  31. Helen said:

    “It was explained to me that Concordia Lutheran University, Austin, became CTX because it operates branches in Houston, Dallas and perhaps some other places. [It was a handy way to drop “Lutheran”, too… but there I go again!]
    CTX has moved to the suburbs, having sold out to a developer who bulldozed everything from Kilian Hall to a dorm less than 10 years old, before sitting down to count the cost of his dream.
    The result is one big building, one bigger hole in the ground, one bankrupt developer and one eyesore for the neighborhood.”

    As a graduate of CTX (NOT CU-T or CUT), let me explain.

    CTX has never been ‘Concordia Lutheran University, Austin’ by name. It began as a boarding high school for boys who wanted to be come pastors in 1926 on a plot of land that, at the time, was on the far-flung outskirts of Austin. In 1951, it became a two-year college (Concordia Lutheran College), then a four-year college in 1980 (Concordia College Austin), and then finally, a four-year university in 1995 (Concordia University at Austin). Helen, Lutheran hasn’t been in the name since 1980. It is not a recent decision, and no one seemed to have a problem with that at the time.

    From 1926 to 2007, the outskirts of Austin became part of central Austin. CUA (as it was known at the time) was landlocked and unable to build more dorms or educational buildings because of city codes and lack of space. They decided to try and find another area for CUA to call home. During this time, they juggled several different options in the area, even going so far as to think about moving out of the Austin area altogether to Giddings, TX. It was decided in the end, however, that the plot of land that Schlumberger oil had already developed was the best option for retaining the student body and staying true to the history of CUA.

    They offered to sell the land to the University of Texas as extra space for their campus, but they were not interested in buying it. Therefore, they did not ‘sell out’ to anyone. Instead, it was bought by a developer who has not been wise in his business dealings (we have since learned that he was not honest with his money) and has since stopped construction; thus, the eyesore. That is no fault of CTX. And I can attest that we were ALL extremely sad to see the old campus go. All the students collected things they could hold on to for the rest of their lives. I, myself, have bits of brick from Kilian and Studtmann on my bookcase at the moment. But when we saw the asbestos and mold being pulled out of all the buildings as it was destroyed, we were glad to move.

    Once the campus was sold, they began to carefully collect all the historical pieces of the campus: the bell from the Ben Nevis ship that transported the Lutheran Wends to religious and cultural freedom (which most Texan Lutherans are descended from), the cruciform, the statue of Martin Luther, plaques, stained glass windows, crosses, time capsules, etc. They put all of these things in storage and have periodically been adding them to the new campus. The 30-year plan includes a museum in which to house all the extra pieces of the old campus that have not been able to be added to the new, as well as paying homage to the old campus.

    I can tell you from personal experience that moving to the new campus was the best possible thing that CTX could have done. They completed the move without going into debt, have not had to increase tuition because of the move, and are growing rapidly. In fact, they are one of the few Concordias (perhaps the only) that is not in debt at the moment. If CTX has pulled off such a major change without going into debt AND growing in student body size, I think we can trust them to be wise in their hiring. Let’s let them worry about it instead of involving ourselves in things we know very little about.

    Todd said:

    “Funny, I didn’t know President Kieschnick actually created leaders. “Let there be Leaders.” And it was so.”

    Point taken. But I’m fairly sure the speaker was alluding to CTX’s mission statement: Developing Christian Leaders, which existed before Kieschnick was hired there.

  32. @Richard Sutis #28
    my encouragement to Rev Kieschnick is to meld Technology into Theology into the Students.

    I guess this must be hyperbole, too?

    [Concordia is advertising a position in communications in the last Witness.]

  33. Too bad he could not have retired and volunteered for this position and maybe let someone who is unemployed with a “real” Dr.’s degree get the newley created job. Too many politics yet. This is what is turning a lot of people away from the church.

  34. Hmm. Having been involved in this debate as a Lutheran school teacher (either way–Lutheranschool teacher or Lutheran schoolteacher), perhaps I’m a bit overly-sensitive to this, but why do we always substitute “Christian” for “Lutheran”? “He is creating Christian leaders for the world, not just the church.” The truth is that, quite often, the word “Christian” is used *specifically* in order to include non-Lutherans in the import of the statement/comment. A Lutheran college/university ought to have as an integral part of their not-so-hidden agenda the development of *Lutheran* leaders, even out of those who come as non-Lutherans. But the word “Christian” then is used in a double-meaning way. “Well, you and I know we mean “Lutheran”, but we can’t say that in public.”

    I always took the other tack–“Lutheran” (properly and Confessionally understood) = “Christian”, therefore, just say “Lutheran”, since we’re not going to water down what we teach, anyway, right? And if someone is *not* willing to say “Lutheran=Christian”, then why are they rostered?

  35. @JD #33

    CSP has a severe hemmed in problem as well. I-94 on the north side, plus a park and high school blocking them to the east. But I do applaud the effort of CTX in their relocation. Sometimes it is a good thing. And to preserve and reuse much of the histroric items is to be commended. Maybe it can provide a option to futre needs (in this area) to other campuses. Thank you for the story.

  36. @JD #33
    [CTX… the rest of the story]

    Not being a graduate of Concordia, I only know what I see driving to work and on Sunday a.m. Thanks for the elaboration.
    Concordia was referred to as CLU when I came to Austin in the 90’s, whatever was on the letterhead. Perhaps that was because Texas Lutheran in Seguin (which once was ALC and had some lcms roots, too) became TLU.

    I did know that some things were saved from the campus. I took a class in Kilian Hall one summer and heard a lot of stories from pastors who had lived there for prep school.

    I did think it a shame that nobody could “recycle” the dormitory which was adjacent to St David’s hospital. But now a lot of buildings, even taller, are being built in West Campus. Beto science building was very new, too.

  37. @helen #38

    Beto Hall was a very new building. I think it was a shame that we weren’t able to keep parts of it for the new campus. As for Harms, the dorm next to St. David’s – I remember packing up my room and finding mold growing through the wall from my bathroom into my bedroom. It was a hastily and cheaply built dorm that had no humidity control and was falling apart fast.

  38. @JD #39
    It was a hastily and cheaply built dorm that had no humidity control and was falling apart fast.

    I shall cease to mourn the waste of that dorm. The waste, it appears, was in building it. 🙁

  39. I’m sure that Rev. Dr. Keishnick will do for Concordia Austin what he has done for the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod-maybe more.

  40. @Kiley Campbell #29
    I am sure that the technology can and will be used much in the same way as Martin uther used the printing press in his day which was a huge step up in technology. God gave man the intellect to develope technology and we need to use it to his glory. On this blog it seems that in whatever way possible a number of only want to blast Rev. Dr. Keishnick no matter what he is doing, he is out of office and you got the man tht you wanted for President so be happy and look forward to the times ahead. I am not hearing the same comments in regards to President Harrison and as he said he is a sinful man just like our former President. So as fellow Christians leave the past in the past just as our Saviour does with our sins they are forgiven and all tht is asked is to do our best each day as we go forword so our works can be a thank offering him for his saving Grace!

  41. @harley Rokenbrodt #42

    But Kieshnick isn’t in the past. He got his restructuring through, and is now a voice at Concordia Austin. And he wrote an article titled “miss me yet?” He is not in the past but still in the cureent public eye, and can give voice and a rally point to a collective paradigm. He has not gone quietly in the night.

  42. @Jason #43
    He commented on a sign that he saw. It is so sad that only one point of view is allowed in your mind. He is in the past as President and what did you want he to do die, because that is the only way on earth that he would not be able to continue his ministry as he sees God directing him. Will you stop doing what you think is God”s direction for you? If not do not expect other too!

  43. It is funny that there are many unchristian respos.to this blog. I would say as a CTX Alum. I am happy to see that he will bring a lot of skill to help raising money for my college. scott schaller

  44. You’d think that (given the dire “pastor shortage” in the LCMS) Dr. Kieschnick would be in a hurry to re-enter parish ministry; perhaps in one of those districts that felt compelled to ignore AC XIV and institute “lay-ministry” programs.
    Smalcald X might suggest we leave the money raising to the MBA’s, and put the MDivs in the pulpit.
    Pax Christi+,
    -Matt Mills

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