Redeeming Holy Days-Candlemas/Presentation

Candlemas is February 2nd, forty days after the birth of Christ it is the Festival of the Purification of Mary. The Gospel Lesson for this festival is Luke 2:22-40. Perhaps this particular festival does not loom as large in significance … Continue reading

Redeeming Holy Days from Pagan Lies: Christmas and Saturnalia

Did Christianity Steal the Date of Pagan Winter Solstice Celebrations? The Roman celebration discussed in this article is the multi-day festival of Saturnalia. The Mis-Use of Roman Sources: Saturnalia In these articles we have seen the texts from the early … Continue reading

Redeeming Holy Days from Pagan Lies: Christmas and Sigillaria

Do the Nativity sets Christians use actually have their origins in the pagan Roman festival called Sigillaria? Sigillaria Macrobius in Saturnalia 1.11.46-50 discusses the Sigillaria–a festival that involves the purchase and giving of little human figures and candles. The fact … Continue reading

Redeeming Christian Holy Days from Pagan Lies: Nativity of St. John (Part 3)

This is the third article on the Nativity of St. John. This article will deal with the Neo-Pagan practice of claiming Celtic origins, “Blame it on the Celts,” or “Claim it’s from the Celts.” We’ll also look at documented German … Continue reading

Redeeming Christian Holy Days from Pagan Lies: Nativity of St. John (Part 2)

 The Claims about Pagan Origins for St. John’s Nativity This is the second of three articles on the Nativity of St. John and its relationship with the Pagan Midsummer. In the previous article we looked at the documentation about the … Continue reading

Redeeming Christian Holy Days from Pagan Lies: Nativity of St. John (Part 1)

This is the first part of three on the Nativity of St. John the Baptist/Midsummer Day June 24th is celebrated as St. John’s Day, also called the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. This festival is part of the cycle … Continue reading

Christmas Catharsis

There’s nothing like a family gathering to raise the blood pressure. If your family is anything like mine, you’ve probably experienced your share of holiday drama (but that’s why we love our families, right?). Things are said and done—often not … Continue reading