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Posts Tagged ‘Book of Concord’

Concord Matters on KFUO: Recap and Preview (by Pr. Charles Henrickson)

December 13th, 2013 5 comments

UPDATE, MONDAY, DEC. 16 . . . I just received this word from on high: The show that was snowed out on Saturday–with host Craig Donofrio and guests Steve Cholak and Ellie Corrow, picking up at paragraph 7 of the Preface–that show will be broadcast LIVE tomorrow, Tuesday, 2:00-3:00 p.m. (Central). Everything else–for example, my guests Daniel Preus and Pam Nielsen for this coming Saturday–will remain the same. Keep calm and carry on. – – – – – – – – – – The second program of Concord Matters is in the books, and the third one is on the   More…

“Concord Matters” premieres on Saturday! (by Pr. Charles Henrickson)

November 29th, 2013 10 comments

“Concord Matters,” a new radio/internet program taking listeners through the Book of Concord, premieres tomorrow, Saturday, November 30, 10:00-11:00 a.m. (Central), live on KFUO, AM 850 in the St. Louis area, and streaming online worldwide at kfuoam.org. The four rotating co-hosts–Rod Zwonitzer, Craig Donofrio, Charles Henrickson, and Joshua Scheer–all will be on hand for the first broadcast, along with guest Tim Rossow. Listeners will be invited to participate with their comments and questions. The programs will be rebroadcast on Tuesdays at 2:00 p.m. (Central), and available anytime in KFUO’s on-demand archives. “Concord Matters” will be a great opportunity for you   More…

Ever want to be a part of a Book of Concord Reading Group?

November 3rd, 2013 15 comments

You will have the chance very soon.  At the end of this month a new endeavor sponsored by the Brothers of John the Steadfast will launch — not on the blog although you will see a lot of posts related to it – but over the radio airwaves and also streaming over the internet.  “Concord Matters” will be a Confessions Reading Group Radio program on KFUO, the radio station of the LCMS.  Each Saturday will have a one hour time of having a host and one or more guests discussing the Confessions as they read through them.  Call-ins are going   More…

Lutherans: The Confessing Church

August 9th, 2013 17 comments

Lutherans confess their faith in Christ; that is, we actively give reasons for the hope of Christ in us. Evidence of this is clearly seen with the Book of Concord which spans fifty years and displays the profound seriousness Luther and our fathers took in putting clear Biblical expressions of our faith down on paper to be read by all and especially by any who would dare make these expressions their own confession of faith. Of course, written expressions of what one believes, teaches, and confesses was not something invented by Lutherans. Perhaps the earliest Christian expression of the faith   More…

CPH — Concordia Triglotta back in print by popular demand!

May 10th, 2013 7 comments

Concordia Publishing House has re-published by popular demand an out-of-print edition of the Book of Concord, Bente’s Triglotta. Get your copy here. This is a unique edition of the Book of Concord featuring the text of the Lutheran Confessions in their original German (1580) edition and Latin (1584) edition, along with an English translation, presented in three running columns with wide margins for study notes. There is no other edition like it. For further details about the Concordia Triglotta please refer to the book’s preface, reproduced below. It should be noted that this edition provides the only easily accessible texts   More…

Categories: Found on the Web Tags: , ,

Listen to Luther, Melancthon, and Chemnitz on your mp3 player for free!

On my way to the 2013 BJS Conference I had some time to listen to stuff on my cheap mp3 player while I sat in the airport and flew on the planes.  So since I was working on catechizing my youth on the glorious gift of baptism I was listening to the Large Catechism.  This was possible through a free download at Librivox of the Book of Concord.  I had been informed of this because the pastor who did this great work was from my own Wyoming District, Pr. Jonathan Lange.  Pr. Lange has done the Church a great service   More…

Steadfast in the Pew: Do We Really Want Reform?

February 27th, 2013 6 comments

Confessional Lutheranism during the middle to late 19th century, when the “New Measures” of Charles Finney were wreaking havoc within American Lutheranism, was threatened with extinction. At that time, American Lutheranism was undergoing an identity crisis and looked to Revivalism for the change believed necessary for their survival in the golden age of American expansion. One Lutheran not interested in following the pop-church fad of the day was Charles Porterfield Krauth, author of the incredibly brilliant tome, “The Conservative Reformation and Its Theology” (CPH, 2007). The American Lutherans of Krauth’s day wanted to look and sound like American Revivalistic Evangelicals   More…

How to Confess Christ

June 13th, 2012 16 comments

With this post we welcome Jim Pierce to the BJS stable of writers. I have known Jim for years adn have had the pleasure of worshipping with him and his pastor in Seattle while visiting my in-laws. Jim has been with BJS from its inception and is known to many as a sharp, confessional, and provacative commenter on the site. It is a good news/bad news welcome. Jim has decided to shut down his apologetics blogsite down due to an illness in his family that he must attend to. In the meantime, he will be writing for us here at   More…

Wawa Theology

A dear colleague, friend and mentor, Rev. Arthur J. Henne is a ’57 graduate of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP).  He is a retired ELCA pastor.  In the Lutheran Church in America (LCA), a predecessor denom to the ELCA, he served many years as a missionary in the Caribbean.  We have known each for about fifteen years and one of our frequent discussions is the demise of his alma mater, LTSP  and his profound sadness over its condition.  It no longer has a Lutheran only professorship.  Art gave me for my 25th anniversary of Ordination The Conservative Reformation by   More…

Minnesota North Encourages Its Congregations to Study the Book of Concord (Communion in One Kind — Part One)

One feature of District and Synodical Conventions is the “mom and apple pie” resolution. These are the kinds of resolutions that no sensible person can really vote against. Cynics suspect that such resolutions are set forward in order to get the “yes” votes rolling, so that the train might continue to roll right through the more controversial topics. (Note to those in charge: This might sound good on paper, but it doesn’t always follow through in actual practice. Use with care.) Whether or not such reasoning is actually the case, I also suspect that it doesn’t look too good in   More…

Steadfast in Worship — Three Words about Worship in the Lutheran Confessions

 I would like to spend a little time with three words mentioned by Pastor Martin Noland in his response (comment #32) to my previous post.  Thank you (and everyone) for your comments! In the Missouri Synod’s latest Rite of Ordination (published with LSB), pastors specifically promise to practice according to the Lutheran Confessions. When you look through the Lutheran Confessions, you find various worship practices set forth.  As you consider these practices, they fit within at least one of three categories: Prescriptive – The Confessions say: “Do thus.” Proscriptive – The Confessions say: “Thus, thou shalt not do.” Descriptive –   More…

Great Stuff Found on the Web — The Book of Concord on the Internet

March 2nd, 2012 4 comments

Not that this is a bit of self-promotion, but .. I couldn’t resist this post from Cyberbrethren. Note some resources not mentioned below are the Daily Readings (available by twitter or email), the bulletin inserts for 3-year and 1-year series, and a Dare to Read pamphlet to help inform your congregation the importance of reading the BoC. Another feature of the site is linking the Augsburg Confession to the Roman Confutation to The Defense of the Augsburg Confession. Look in any of these sections for something that looks like this: Another website, bocl.org (that’s capital l, not 1, as in   More…

Steadfast in Worship — Considering all of the Confessions.

When I became a pastor in the Lutheran Church, I said that I would perform the duties of my office in accordance with the Lutheran Confessions. I promised, with the help of God, to preach and teach and administer the Sacraments in conformity with the Holy Scriptures and these Confessions. (To the best of my knowledge, such statements are standard at the ordinations and installations of Lutheran pastors, at least in the Missouri Synod.) So, when push comes to shove and the rubber hits the road, what is the result of these statements and promises? What does it mean –   More…

Steadfast WELS — It begins on paper

February 23rd, 2012 50 comments

I’ve been graciously asked to bring a little bit of WELS history and an occasional WELS perspective to the Steadfast readers. I’m quite sure most of my brothers in the WELS would agree that I’m not exactly your stereotypical (or even typical) WELS pastor. There. Now you know. This should be interesting. Let’s begin with the most important thing in the Holy Christian Church on earth – numbers. Here’s how the WELS looks on paper: Congregational membership: 389,545 Churches: 1279 Elementary Schools:334 Pastors: 1305 Teachers: 1846 Staff ministers: 106 The synod operates one seminary, one pastor/teacher training college and two   More…

“These Words” (The Sacrament of the Altar), by Pr. Charles Henrickson

“The Six Chief Parts of Lenten Catechesis” The Ten Commandments The Creed The Lord’s Prayer The Sacrament of Holy Baptism Confession The Sacrament of the Altar “These Words” (The Sacrament of the Altar) Tonight we conclude our series on “The Six Chief Parts of Lenten Catechesis.” So far we’ve been following the Catechism in looking at the basics of the Christian faith and life: The Ten Commandments, the Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, the Sacrament of Holy Baptism, and Confession. That brings us tonight to the Sacrament of the Altar.