Steadfast Marquart — Abortion and Luther’s Two Kingdoms Theology

January 17th, 2013 Post by

Chalkboard - AbortionThe following is an excerpt from a paper of the late Professor Kurt Marquart. It was given at Mequon in 2002 and is titled, “Abortion and Luther’s Two Kingdoms Theology.” With the upcoming anniversary of Roe v. Wade, I thought it appropriate to provide these excellent paragraphs from a doctor of the church who fought ardently against abortion with Allen County Right to Life, as well as other pro-life groups.    - Robert Paul

Before the excerpts I leave you with the rather poignant concluding paragraph:

“The Supreme Court decision of 1973 is just as wrong as the Dred Scott ruling of 1857, which held that slaves were property and not “persons” under the law!  It took a Civil War to reverse that!  The constitutional status of the unborn to-day is completely analogous.  The moral and legal absurdity of our present situation is that while the corporations which slaughter the unborn for profit have full constitutional protection as (corporate) “persons” in law, their genuinely human victims do not!  We cannot rest until this obscenity is reversed.” K. Marquart, “Abortion and Luther’s Two Kingdoms Theology,” 23.

Professor Kurt Marquart

Excerpts from “Abortion and Luther’s Two Kingdoms Theology”

Mequon, WI – 10 March 2002

The church is the realm not of force or coercion, but of grace.  She comes into being, and is constantly renewed and preserved, not by reason or by the Law, but by the Gospel (in Word and Sacrament) alone.  Yet the proclamation of the Law is always presupposed, the way a diagnosis is presupposed by the cure or remedy in medical practice.  Also, believers receive from the Gospel the desire and the power to serve and please God, namely according to His revealed will or Law.  This is the so-called “third use of the Law.”  In the matter of abortion, the revealed will of God is perfectly clear, and must be taught in the church in no uncertain terms.

The decisive moral truth here is twofold:  (1) Human beings are such from conception, and (2) it is wrong to shed innocent human blood.  The first truth is evident from texts like Ps. 51:5; 139:13-17; Job 10:10-11; and Jer. 1:5.  The object of conception here is “me,” not some amorphous entity which later developed into “me”!  The late Mother Theresa was fond of pointing out that the unborn St. John the Baptist was the first human to welcome Our Lord to earth, when He Himself was as yet unborn!  See the account of the Visitation in St. Luke 1:39 ff. And the Church celebrates the Miracle of the Incarnation exactly nine months before the Nativity, in other words, on the 25th of March.  It would be monstrous to declare either Our Lord Himself, or St. John, somehow pre-human, or non-human, or sub-human and therefore freely abortable prior to birth!

The second truth is equally clear from texts like Gen. 4:10 and Numbers 35:33.  Shedding innocent blood is not simply an “ordinary” sin, if indeed there is such a thing.  Rather it is a “heaven-crying” sin—as is also Sodomy (Gen. 18:20-21), withholding just wages from workers (St. James 5:4), and oppression of the helpless generally (Exodus 3:7-9; 22:21-24; etc.).  In view of King Herod’s brutal slaughter of the babies of Bethlehem (St. Mt. 2:16), the ancient church called abortion “Herodism.”

It is true that abortion as such is not expressly dealt with in the New Testament.  Some scholars believe, however,  that when lists of vices refer to “murder” in close proximity to “immorality” and “witchcraft,” abortion is meant.  See Rev. 9:21; 21:8; 22:15.  “Pharmakia/pharmakon” (“sorcery/sorcerer”) included the preparation and administration of abortifacients.  Further,  Strack-Billerbeck point out the real meaning of St. Jn. 18:28, where the Jewish leaders “themselves did not enter the praetorium, so that they might not be defiled, but might eat the passover.”  The point here is that Gentile houses were considered to be places defiled by the dead bodies of aborted babies.  Entering such a house meant contracting the defilement of having touched a dead body (Nu. 19:14)—unless the house was vouched for by a Jewish slave or woman who had observed it in this regard (p. 838)!

Attempts have been made to write off the opposition to abortion simply as a “sectarian” (i.e. Roman Catholic) issue.  In fact that was the deliberate strategy of pro-abortion forces in the early ‘70s, according to then-insider Bernard Nathanson (1983, pp. 177 ff.).  For that reason it is important that the public and the media regularly encounter “Lutherans for Life,”  “Baptists for Life,” etc.  The irony is, however, that whereas the Roman Catholic Church to-day is undoubtedly the major champion of the pro-life cause among Western churches, it was not so in the sixteenth century.  According to the 1978 Encyclopedia of Bioethics, the

reformers [Luther, Melachthon, and Calvin are meant] insisted upon the full humanity of the fetus from the time of conception. . .  The major reformers, then, were rigorously opposed to abortion at any stage of pregnancy.  Moreover, they had significantly enhanced the fetal status for reasons more basically doctrinal than for ethical reasons against abortion.  Regarding fetal status, they were more conservative than the sixteenth-century Roman Catholic Church, which still maintained the Septuagint’s distinction between the “unformed” an the “formed” fetus, and with it a consequent distinction in the gravity of abortion, depending upon its timing (1:14).

The real authority behind this false distinction was Aristotle, who held that “ensoulment” or “quickening” happens in the case of males 40 days after conception, and 80 days after it in the case of females!

Highly suggestive, too, is the connexion between the words for “womb” and “mercy” in several languages.  In Hebrew the word for both is racham.  The German Barmherzigkeit (mercy) literally means “womb-heartedness.”  I understand that the same is true in the case of the related Dutch language.  Perhaps the reason for this odd linguistic link is that nothing expresses compassion better than the tender solicitude which expectant mothers feel for their pre-born babies.  No asylum on earth should be safer or more inviolate than that sacred refuge which nurtures the developing baby beneath its mother’s heart for the first nine months of its life.  To invade and destroy that is to destroy human mercy at its very source.  It is part and parcel of the progressive brutalisation of human life, documented daily in the news media.

Mercy stands at the heart of the Christian faith.  Having received God’s radical mercy in His Son, we are then to be merciful towards one another.  Justice is not enough—it is compassion that must reign among Christians.  This is why Our Lord places such a high premium on mutual forgiveness.  He even teaches us to pray that we should not be forgiven if we do not forgive those who trespass against us!  The reason for this is given in the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (St. Mt. 18:23-35):  the psychological monstrosity of the situation dramatises the truth that to refuse to forgive is not to believe oneself forgiven!  If one truly believes oneself forgiven by God in Christ, one cannot possibly refuse forgiveness to another.   Persistent refusal to do so therefore is a clear confession of unbelief.

The Gospel of God’s mercy must also shape the church’s handling of the abortion issue.  It goes without saying that abortion must not be presented as the one unforgivable sin.  The Lord welcomes all penitent sinners, and Christian preaching—unlike mere social crusading—dare never forget this.  Two anecdotes illustrate different facets of the problem.  A good friend and colleague of mine in Australia had opened a pregnancy crisis centre in Adelaide.  One day a fifteen-year old girl came in, thinking she could get an abortion there.  My friend showed her the ghastly reality of abortion, and she decided to keep her baby.  A few days later her enraged father came in, fulminating:  “I am an elder at such-and-such a church.  Don’t you realise how I shall be disgraced if she has this illegitimate child?  How dare you tell her not to have an abortion?”  It would be difficult to imagine a more repulsive instance of unmerciful Pharisaic cruelty!  How can a father be so obsessed with appearances as to wish to burden his own daughter’s soul with the sin of murder?  Yet such is the oppressive power of the false god of Respectability, which disfigures so much of our “church”-culture!

The other example I heard some years ago from one of the leaders of “Women Exploited,” women who had been misled into having abortions, and then came to regret it lifelong.  This lady told us how she had believed the propaganda that the foetus was simply a mass of cells, and how horrified she had been when she saw the clearly human shape of the being she had killed.  In her guilt and despair she went to her pastor and confessed her sin.  But he made light of it and said, “It’s OK, don’t worry about it!”  That, she said, did not help her at all.  She knew that it was not “OK,” and that she had done evil.  What she needed was absolution, forgiveness, not excuses!

In concrete pastoral care, the full weight of the Law’s condemnation must fall not on the poor, troubled woman or girl who had an abortion and regretted ever after, but on callous “Christian” doctors and nurses who habitually do abortion “procedures,” without any emotional confusion or pressure, but simply for money!  They need to be told that until they repent, they cannot receive the Holy Sacrament, I Jn. 3:15.  Those who shed innocent blood may not partake of the Sacred Cup of the Lord’s Blood!

These are the sorts of things which Christians ought to be saying to one another in the spiritual realm, in Christ’s holy Church.  Finally, the public teachers of the Church especially are not doing their full duty in this matter if they neglect to tell their hearers that it is their solemn duty to use such economic and political “clout” as they have to restore the protection of the law to the unborn.  That is not “politics” but a basic decency required by the Fifth Commandment:

Likewise, if you see anyone who is [innocently] condemned to death or in similar peril and do not save him although you have means and ways to do so, you have killed him.  It will be of no help for you to use the excuse that you did not assist their deaths by word or deed, for you have withheld your love from them and robbed them of the kindness by means of which their lives might have been saved . . .

Therefore God rightly calls all persons murderers who o not offer counsel or assistance to those in need and peril of body and life.  . .  What else is this but to call these people murderous and bloodthirsty?  For although you have not actually committed all these crimes, as far as you are concerned, you have nevertheless permitted your neighbours to languish and perish in their misfortune (Large Catechism,  Kolb-Wengert, p. 412).

 






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  1. #4 Kitty
    January 18th, 2013 at 19:59 | #1

    @“LC-MS Quotes” #50
    I love his writing. Do you think he meant “Our Generation of Moderns” contemptuously?
    If so, I wonder what he would make of our generation of “Post-Moderns”.

  2. Elizabeth Peters
    January 18th, 2013 at 20:00 | #2

    No offense, Kitty, but your picture totally creeps me out.

  3. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 18th, 2013 at 20:29 | #3

    And then there arose this generation, this cynical, sophisticated, self-satisfied generation, which so largely knows not the God of its fathers and prides itself in this ignorance, which so frequently has set up the modern counterpart of the ancient Baalim, the idols of mass production, grinning Mammon, the false gods of material, selfish, sensual worship, with the tragic consequences that we are living in the greatest away-from-God movement that the country has ever known.

    “Our Generation of Moderns”
    The Lutheran Hour
    Winged Words to Modern America,
    Broadcast in the Coast-to-Coast
    Radio Crusade for Christ
    Walter A. Maier, PH. D.
    CPH, 1931

  4. Norman Teigen
    January 19th, 2013 at 08:23 | #4

    Scott #18…my reference to the author’s being “young” did not refer to chronological age. His comments, and editor Scheer’s subsequent reaction, indicate to me immaturity of thought and persuasion. One can have very strong opinions on subjects but the persuasiveness depends on the speaker’s methods. To use a poor method undermines the very credibility which the speaker intends to make. This is Persuasion 101 and I was simply suggesting that the use of the analogy wouldn’t hold. Scaglia and Koopman are certainly persuasive sources and I am glad that the writer included this information. Perhaps the analogy does hold, but I doubt it and I think that a reading of Schwartz would support this.

    The reactions indicate that the topic is wrapped up in different points of view with symbolic narratives. My synod, to illustrate, posted a standardized anti-Roe v Wade anniversary comment with an illustration of a pistol being aimed at the swollen abdomen of a very pregnant woman. This posting is an example of an inflammatory means of persuasion which, in my opinion, is highly offensive. Pushback against the responsible editor has been initiated.

    As to #15, Andrew, I suggest that you put on your big boy pants before you make comments like that.

    #31, thank you for the comment. For sure, I have a motivation to go to church tomorrow where I can hear the gracious words of sin and grace. Romans 5 has always been a source of comfort and consolation and I will read those words as preparation for the Holy Communion which will be offered at the 8 am service in my Evangelical Lutheran Synod congregation.

    Norman Teigen, Layman (and sinner)
    Evangelical Lutheran Synod

  5. January 19th, 2013 at 08:51 | #5

    @Norman Teigen #4
    So your reference to “young” in your second comment is referring to immaturity? And my defense of Mr. Paul’s character is also immature? I see…I guess that is convenient for you.

    You seem to be the only one with your point of view here – in my immaturity I usually take that as a sign that something may be wrong with what I am writing or doing.

    And Andrew does have big boy pants on, has for some time (I believe he is potty trained too!).

    Have you gotten enough attention for your rants yet or do you need more?

    Mr. Tiegen, I have defended you before. You have now thrown some awful words at two of my authors here. You owe both of them an apology instead of name calling and making demeaning statements.

    You are on warning – the next time you call one of my authors a name or try to ruin their character – you will not be allowed to comment here anymore. Both of these men are on their way to being ordained (God-willing), and both have taken significant risk to things by writing for us here at BJS. That is courage and character, not immaturity.

  6. Norman Teigen
    January 19th, 2013 at 09:23 | #6

    Please spell my name properly. It is T E I G E N, not Tiegen. Your warning is proof of your immaturity as an editor.

    Norman Teigen

  7. January 19th, 2013 at 09:25 | #7

    @Norman Teigen #6
    My apologies for misspelling your name.

    Good bye Norman. This is the last thread you are hijacking here at BJS.

  8. #4 Kitty
    January 19th, 2013 at 10:12 | #8

    @“LC-MS Quotes” #3
    Again, awesome quote. I mean who can write like that anymore? And his perspective on the early 20th century!

    @Elizabeth Peters #2
    My apologies for the picture Elizabeth. I’ll try to update it today.

  9. mbw
    January 19th, 2013 at 11:17 | #9

    @Norman Teigen #6

    > Please spell my name properly

    Maybe you should americanize it if you are offended by such a common misspelling.

  10. mbw
    January 19th, 2013 at 11:25 | #10

    mbw :
    @Norman Teigen #6
    > Please spell my name properly
    Maybe you should americanize it if you are offended by such a common misspelling.

    My ancestors decided Weidner would cause problems but their decision has cost me some German street cred.

  11. helen
    January 19th, 2013 at 11:39 | #11

    @mbw #9
    @Norman Teigen #6
    > Please spell my name properly

    Maybe you should americanize it if you are offended by such a common misspelling.

    Now that IS an unnecessary/inappropriate remark!
    Feeling safe because Teigen can’t reply here? (Or because you hide your name?)

    Spell checker has no options for Teigen.
    [OTOH, the options for, e.g., Scheer are multiple.
    "america" doesn't know what to do with 'sch'.]
    Not picking on Scheer; it’s the only name up there at the moment.

    Pastor Scheer, I remarked not long ago that moderators here wrote private posts to people who were not meeting guidlines and did not have public spats, culminating in bans!

    Sorry to see that I’m wrong this morning!
    I hope you will cool off and reconsider… perhaps remember Todd’s comment.

    From my perspective at the other end of life,
    being referred to as “young” is enviable!
    As you will find it, too, soon enough.

  12. Loren Koopman
    January 19th, 2013 at 19:52 | #12

    Thank you Pastor Scheer for trying to keep this site safe from wolves by making good on your warning. That is truly being a good shepherd. It’s ironic after misspelling Scalia and Koop’s name in his previous post, he goes ballistic on you!

    After my new pastor told me a classmate of his by the name of Rob Paul was writing for BJS and that he was “brilliant” , imagine my surprise to see a post the very next day! Brilliant and courageous, there is yet hope for the church.

    Loren

  13. Joe Strieter
    January 19th, 2013 at 22:41 | #13

    mbw :
    @Norman Teigen #6
    > Please spell my name properly
    Maybe you should americanize it if you are offended by such a common misspelling.

    C’mon already! That’s a semi-cheap shot.

    There’s nothing wrong with expecting one’s name to be spelled correctly. It’s just common courtesy.

    My name has been misspelled a gazillion times, and mispronounced just as often. There is no way I’m going to spell it “Streeter” or “Streder” or “Streator”. No way. “Teigen” is just fine–why should he bow to the LCD? Americanizing people’s names blurs their distinctiveness, their ethnicity, and homogenizes the culture.

    “Teigen” it is, and “Teigen” it shall remain.

  14. Jack
    January 20th, 2013 at 03:38 | #14

    Taken by itself, Mr. Teigen’s first sentence, in #6, is certainly a reasonable request.

    How, though is one to consider the first sentence without it being taken in context with the second?

  15. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 20th, 2013 at 06:08 | #15

    Restore the Bible, and the Church and the nation will enter into a new era of hope and promise. There, in the return to God, not in any modern sociological, economic, or legislative program, not in any political, industrial, or educational reforms, lies the hope of the nation. “Seek ye Me,” God says to apostate Israel, and He repeats to ungrateful America, “and ye shall live.”

    “Our Generation of Moderns”
    The Lutheran Hour
    Winged Words to Modern America,
    Broadcast in the Coast-to-Coast
    Radio Crusade for Christ
    Walter A. Maier, PH. D.
    CPH, 1931

  16. helen
    January 20th, 2013 at 12:08 | #16

    @“LC-MS Quotes” #15
    “Seek ye Me,” God says to apostate Israel, and He repeats to ungrateful America, “and ye shall live.” W.A.M., 1931

    There were more people who knew what Walter A Maier was talking about in 1931.
    [And less overt opposition from the government to orthodox religion...]

    Which doesn’t mean we should give up, but read James and persevere.

  17. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 20th, 2013 at 13:41 | #17

    And there arose another generation after them which knew not the Lord nor yet the works which He had done for Israel. And the children of Israel did evil in the sight of the Lord and served Baalim. And they forsook the Lord God of their fathers. Judg. 2, 10–12.

    I have never been able to read the account of this stupendous change in two successive generations without drawing almost an unconscious parallel with a notable change that has come over the American people. You may search the records of the century and a half in which our God-blessed nation has enjoyed its independence; you may go back another century and a half to the Colonial days, when the Pilgrim Fathers first set foot on the forbidding shores of New England; and never in the three hundred years of our national existence will you find two generations that even begin to differ as those two do that have formed history from the days after the close of the Civil War down to the present moment. Never has there been a change as startling and deplorable as the contrast that has made this age the generation that has forgotten God.

    “Our Generation of Moderns”
    The Lutheran Hour
    Winged Words to Modern America,
    Broadcast in the Coast-to-Coast
    Radio Crusade for Christ
    Walter A. Maier, PH. D.
    CPH, 1931

  18. Carl Vehse
    January 20th, 2013 at 14:01 | #18

    @“LC-MS Quotes” #17: …never in the three hundred years of our national existence will you find two generations that even begin to differ as those two do that have formed history from the days after the close of the Civil War down to the present moment. Never has there been a change as startling and deplorable as the contrast that has made this age the generation that has forgotten God. – Walter A. Maier, PH. D.

    Dr. Maier might puke in his grave if he knew within two generations, the U.S. would be engaged in the traitorous murder of unborn children on a genocidal scale, and within another generation the U.S. would have traitorous politicians and a political party flaunt their support for abortion to win elections and re-elections. If he had known, he might also have pleaded an imprecatory prayer to God against this wickedness and these satanic foes… or maybe not. But there is no excuse for us not to do so today.

  19. #4 Kitty
    January 20th, 2013 at 15:40 | #19

    If he had known, he might also have pleaded an imprecatory prayer to God against this wickedness and these satanic foes… or maybe not. But there is no excuse for us not to do so today.

    I couldn’t agree with you more Carl. If Dr Maier’s generation is the age where God is forgotten then our current age can at least be credited for recalling him. ~ But only as the object of outright rebellion! I wonder if the time has finally come for CPH to publish a Lutheran book of imprecatory prayer.

  20. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 20th, 2013 at 16:46 | #20

    The fathers and mothers of many who are listening to-night grew up in these United States, brought more than 12,000,000 immigrants from Europe to the Promised Land of magic America.

    And because they believed that God had led them across the Atlantic or across the plains and the Rockies as He had led Joshua’s men through the trackless wilderness, they served God. They organized most of our Christian congregations; they built the majority of our church edifices. They gave the impetus to much of the mission-work at home and abroad. They established many of our Christian schools, as did the founders of my Church, men with university distinctions, who, before they had lived a year in the hinterland of Missouri, cut down the trees that were to build the walls of a backwoods divinity school. That generation had its faults, frailties, that everlasting mark the moral feebleness of humanity, and we do not make the mistake of showing reverence to the past simply because it is so far distant that its shortcomings may be glossed over and minimized. But with all necessary concessions one definite and unalterable fact stands out sharply and distinctly — the generation of our fathers and mothers knew God; it recognized His providential deliverance, the certainty of His judgment, and the boundlessness of His grace.

    “Our Generation of Moderns”
    The Lutheran Hour
    Winged Words to Modern America,
    Broadcast in the Coast-to-Coast
    Radio Crusade for Christ
    Walter A. Maier, PH. D.
    CPH, 1931

  21. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 20th, 2013 at 19:12 | #21

    In our own country the 1917 birth-rate was 24.7 per thousand. Ten years later, in 1927, this figure dropped to 20.6; and after another decade, in 1937, the American birth-rate figure was 17. A graphical summary of the decrease in our American birth-rate presents these figures: In 1850, exclusive of slaves, the average size of the American family was 5.66; in 1860, similarly excluding slaves, it was 5.3; in 1870 it dropped to 5.1; in 1890 it declined to 4.9; in 1900 to 4.7; in 1920 to 4.3; and in 1930 it reached the lowest level of all times, 3.4. Fewer children were born in the United States during 1933 than any year since the start of the twentieth century.

    Many and contradictory attempts have been made to explain these drastic declines, but no reasonable doubt remains that the most pronounced factor in the diminution of our American families is the employment of artificial means to restrict the size of the family, — birth control, as the term is commonly understood.

    The specific methods of birth control are suggested by courses given in some of our American colleges. The Conference on Education for Marriage and Family Social Relations that reports in the Journal of Social Hygiene, January, 1936, p. 29, protests: “It is rather surprising to find 15 of 105 courses in some of the 225 American colleges that offer instruction on marriage and family life giving an hour to ‘technique of birth control,’ a topic which is illegal in many States and generally is regarded as suitable only for medical schools.”

    “The Blight of Birth Control”
    For Better Nor For Worse
    A Manual of Christian Matrimony
    Walter A. Maier, PH. D.
    CPH, 1939

  22. Abby
    January 20th, 2013 at 19:23 | #22

    @20 “I wonder if the time has finally come for CPH to publish a Lutheran book of imprecatory prayer.”

    We don’t need a new one. The Psalms are good enough. And they are God’s very own words.

  23. R.D.
    January 20th, 2013 at 22:21 | #23

    @“LC-MS Quotes” #21
    I think it’s time for cph to reprint “for better, not worse”. Great book!

    Perhaps Teigen could read it, then enlighten us as to the immaturity of Walter A. Maier

  24. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 21st, 2013 at 05:20 | #24

    Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord. — Ps. 127, 3.

    When our text calls children “an heritage of the Lord,” that is, the gift of love which a bountiful Father bequeaths to His sons and daughters, it takes an attitude toward childhood which is directly and determinedly opposed to much of modern thought. To-day, in our era of diminished families, when the graduates of our select women’s colleges exclude themselves from motherhood and when all the modern theories for the looseness of the marriage relation are built up on the idea of childless families, children are frequently regarded as inconvenient restrictions and unnecessary hindrances in life. Only in this way can we explain the motive behind our steadily decreasing birth-rates and the corresponding diminution in the number of the fine large families so frequent a generation or two ago.

    “Childhood — Heaven’s Heritage”
    The Lutheran Hour
    Winged Words to Modern America,
    Broadcast in the Coast-to-Coast
    Radio Crusade for Christ
    Walter A. Maier, PH. D.
    CPH, 1931

  25. “LC-MS Quotes”
    January 21st, 2013 at 05:34 | #25

    Is not virtually every reason given for an abortion a decision swayed by self-interest, self-love. Even in the exceptional cases where the life of a mother is endangered by a pregnancy or birth the Christian mother will very seriously question whether she should sacrifice her child to save herself. Let every Christian parent lift up holy hands to the heavenly Father to ask for help and guidance, for strength to do His will.

    When nations and people think they can solve future problems by genocide or geno suicide the Christians can increase and multiply in the measure in which they increase in faith.

    With horror we think of the hundreds and thousands of unborn lives sacrificed to the Moloch of self-service. With Abraham we pray that God would spare our nation for the sake of the righteous. There still is time to warn against racial suicide, but Christians know, that there is no future for this world. The measure of sins has long been full and at His time the Judge of the Quick and the Dead will put a total end to this aeon and take all His children to Himself into the New Heaven and New Earth where righteousness will dwell.
    God Have Mercy On Us!

    The Deadly ABC
    Prof. M. J. Naumann, D.D. (CTS faculty, 1948-72)
    Springfield, Illinois
    December 28, 1970, Holy Innocents Day,
    Exodus 1:15-22, Matt. 2:16-18

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