Great Stuff Found on the Web — 2008 Rocky Mountain District Worship Conference

November 29th, 2010 Post by

I came across this posting from Pr. Kurt Hering giving videos of the 2008 RMD Worship Conference.


In 2008 the Rocky Mountain District hosted a theological conference on Lutheran Worship. The conference included three presentations and a concluding panel discussion involving the three presenters.

It will take an investment of about 3 hours of your time, but I think it will be time well spent in helping us understand what we are dealing with in regard to issues of worship and the errors that have become entrenched in our synod in the area of worship.

 

There seems to me to be one glaring error that jumps out and begs to be treated, if not merely by a cursory glance at the list of presenters, then in understanding the implications of a public worship role that one of them says he exercises in light of the “office” which he holds.

Rather than offering my analysis I would like to hear yours with this quote from Luther in mind.

If I profess with loudest voice and clearest expostion every portion of the truth of God except precisely that little point which the world and the devil are at that moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Christ.

– quote falsely attributed to Dr. Martin Luther
but he wrote many things with this sentiment

In der Liebe Christi,
Rev. Kurt Hering, Pastor
Trinity Lutheran Church
Layton, Utah






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  1. Rev. Jacob Ehrhard
    November 29th, 2010 at 12:17 | #1

    It only takes a few minutes of each presentation to see that the point of departure for historic liturgy is theology, while the point of departure for contemporary worship is anthropology. That is to say that the argument given for historic liturgy begins with God and His Word and the argument for contemporary worship begins with man.

    The first question asked in the panel discussion is also quite revealing. In response to “Why don’t the seminaries teach more theology of contemporary worship?” the presenter said that they do, but it doesn’t matter what kind of container holds that theology.

    It’s time to think outside of the liturgical box. What if liturgy isn’t the container at all? What if theology is the container?

  2. Rev. Jacob Ehrhard
    November 29th, 2010 at 12:20 | #2

    Sorry, the end of the first paragraph should read: “That is to say that the argument given for historic liturgy begins with God and His Word and the argument for contemporary worship begins with man.” comment 1 corrected by moderator

    Is there any defense of contemporary worship that does not begin with anthropology?

  3. Jason
    November 29th, 2010 at 12:38 | #3

    Rev. Jacob Ehrhard :Is there any defense of contemporary worship that does not begin with anthropology?

    I really haven’t seen one. The closest I have encountered are “Christian freedom” and “adiaphora.” But then you get into the whole symantic argument about what those words mean and how they are applied.

  4. November 29th, 2010 at 13:47 | #4

    @Rev. Jacob Ehrhard #2

    That is an excellent point, Jacob.

  5. young blood
    November 29th, 2010 at 22:38 | #5

    In the panel discussion, John Jordening says he came from a congregation that did the sacrament before the sermon because they had simultaneous services. The pastor would preach first at one and then go down at preach at the other. I think he was implying that the sacrament would take place at both services while the pastor was preaching at the opposite service. WHO ON EARTH WAS CONSECRATING AND ADMINISTERING THE SACRAMENT WHILE THE PASTOR IS PREACHING AT THE OTHER ARENA?!?

  6. Timmy
    November 30th, 2010 at 16:21 | #6

    “A lot of these (contemporary) songs just don’t stand on their own the way Hymnody stands on it’s own.”

    Pretty much speaks for itself…….

  7. Jon Jordening
    December 1st, 2010 at 14:28 | #7

    Yes, the Sacrament took place at both services, toward the beginning before the message at one and toward the end after the message at the other. There was more than one pastor on staff so they consecrated and administered the Sacrament in the other service.@young blood #5

  8. Jon Jordening
    December 1st, 2010 at 18:54 | #8

    Rev. Jacob Ehrhard :
    The first question asked in the panel discussion is also quite revealing. In response to “Why don’t the seminaries teach more theology of contemporary worship?” the presenter said that they do, but it doesn’t matter what kind of container holds that theology.

    Greetings Pastor Ehrhard. During the session I had shared a quote indicating that we shouldn’t let the “container” change the “content” of our worship, that being Christ. My intent was to communicate that the Seminaries don’t need to teach “contemporary” worship because they teach the theology that forms our worship. I think that many on the contemporary side of the discussion get fixated on the label/container and want our institutions to teach the how-to of contemporary and fail to see that there is a theology that drives it. (Note: Most would agree that there is a theology driving contemporary worship. They just don’t what that theology is). My attempt to have them toss the label of “contemporary” aside (the container) for a minute, and focus on the fact that our Seminaries teach the theology that forms our worship, may not have succeeded. I can see though, that from a lex orandi, lex credendi standpoint, the “container” is formed by the theology within, and therefore matters a great deal.

    I applaud your question, “What if theology is the container?”

  9. young blood
    December 1st, 2010 at 22:56 | #9

    @Jon Jordening #7
    Thanks for clarifying.
    The comment that one pastor had to go down to the other place to preach made me think there was only one total pastor doing both services. I see the situation clearer now. Thank you!

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