Higher Things Lenten Reflections

Higher Things (for BJS) We all know that Lent is a time for repentance, reconciliation amongst the brethren, and even suffering. It’s even an occasion for a fish fry or two. However, one thing that most often gets left out is using the Lenten season as a time for reflection. It’s important that we take the time everyday to contemplate, meditate, and reflect on the suffering, death, and resurrection of Christ. Why? Because we baptized have traveled the same travels with Christ. This is made more evident to us during the repentant season of Lent. In baptism we suffer as Christ suffered, we die the death of Christ, and we arise to a new life through those most Holy waters. As St. Paul wrote to the Romans and to the generations who confess the faith, “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life.” And we certainly walk in that newness of life. Let us reflect on this truth.
During this Lenten season of repentance and forgiveness let us together pour ourselves into study, right understanding, right confession, and reflection. Higher Things offers a fantastic tool for us to do so through their devotional reflections. Higher Things is dedicated to proper teaching, confession, liturgics, and the proper reception of Christ’s most Holy gifts. This is solidified and exemplified in the Higher Things reflections, not only through Lent but for the entire church year. I look forward to joining with all of you in reflecting, praying, and enjoying the peace that surpasses all human understanding with you as we venture through these reflections together as brothers and sisters (bound by grace) in confessing the true doctrine of Christ our Lord. May the peace of God be with us through this season of repentance and even for evermore.
Here is the Lenten Reflection for today (The Wednesday of Invocabit) from Higher Things:
HT reflections I

Daily Lectionary: Genesis 8:13-9:17; Mark 4:1-20
I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth. What does
this mean? I believe that God has made me and all creatures; that He has given
me my body and soul, eyes, ears and all my members, my reason and all my
senses and still takes care of them… (The Small Catechism: The Creed, First
Article)

In the Name + of Jesus. Amen. “Invocabit. He will call upon Me.” And what shall we call Him? How about, “Father.” Some of the first words we learn are “mama” or “dada.” We learn to call on our parents, to get their attention and receive what we need from them. You have been born from above in Holy Baptism. You have a new birth into the kingdom of God. Now, because of Jesus, God, the Father, is YOUR Father. We learn that God is our Father because He has made us. He gives us life. He created us in the womb of our mothers and brought us into this world.
He made us and still takes care of us. While this is true, we would never know it on our own. We would figure, as the world does, that we came from nowhere and are going nowhere, just random bits of intelligent dust floating through the universe.
But your heavenly Father has sent His only-begotten Son into the flesh to redeem you from this darkness of sin. He has sent Jesus to rescue you from this dead-end way of thinking in which we don’t know our Creator or know but refuse to acknowledge and believe in Him.
So Jesus comes into this world to save us, sent by the Father. He is born as we are born, with body and soul, eyes, ears and His members with all His fingers and toes—so that His head could be crowned with thorns and His hands and feet pierced with nails and His side ripped open by a spear. So His blood could spill for you. That’s how you know your Father loves you, if you ever doubt.
And it is easy to doubt. In this world that is full of sin, it is often easier to believe the lie that we are just random nothings rather than precious children in God’s sight. So the Father has given you a new birth in Christ. He has baptized you and forgiven your sins and put His own name upon your lips so that you may, as dear children ask their dear fathers,call upon Him and say, “Abba,Father.” For He is your heavenly Father and He loves you as His own Son in His Son. In the Name of Jesus. Amen.

We all believe in one true God, Father, Son and Holy Ghost, Ever present help
in need, Praised by all the heav’nly host; All He made His love enfolds, All
creation He upholds. (We All Believe in One True God, LSB 953:1)

You can find the Lenten Reflections HERE.

For more Higher Things Reflections throughout the year you can find them HERE.
From Above
Don’t forget to sign up for the Higher Things conferences coming up this summer. That information can be found HERE.


Comments

Higher Things Lenten Reflections — 2 Comments

  1. From the main post: “In baptism we suffer as Christ suffered….”

    Did not Christ suffer for the sins of the whole world, in his flesh and in his spirit, dying in agony, forsaken by the Father?

    Really, who among us has suffered like that?

    “For the love of Christ controls us, because we have concluded this: that one has died for all, therefore all have died; he died for all, that those who live might no longer live for themselves but for him who for their sake died and was raised.” 2 Cor 5:14-15 ESV

    Among other things, baptism marks the first steps in following Jesus. Jesus died to himself to honor his Father and save humankind; we die to ourselves to honor our Savior and love humankind. As Jesus relinquished one life to attain another, so do those who would follow him.

    And yet this is not our doing, but God’s doing in us. To him be the glory!

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